Washington's War on Silicon Valley

Hey, let's kill the Golden Goose that created the technology boom.

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A must-read op-ed in the WSJ today:

For more than 30 years the entrepreneurship-venture capital-IPO cycle centered in Silicon Valley has generated new wealth, commercialized innovation, and created new companies and industries. It's also spun off millions of new jobs. ... It has been a system of amazing efficiency, its biggest past weakness being that it sometimes (as in the dot-com "bubble") creates too many companies of dubious viability. Now, this very efficiency may be proving to be its downfall.  ... From the beginning of this decade, the process of new company creation has been under assault by legislators and regulators. ... In the name of "fairness," preventing future Enrons, and increased oversight, Congress, the SEC and the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) have piled burdens onto the economy that put entrepreneurship at risk.  ... According to the National Venture Capital Association, in all of 2008 there have been just six companies that have gone public. Compare that with 269 IPOs in 1999, 272 in 1996, and 365 in 1986. ... The most important government actions to foster business creation were the 1978 Steiger Amendment, which cut taxes on capital gains to 28% from 49%, and President Ronald Regan's tax cuts, which reduced them still further to 20%. These tax cuts unleashed the PC and consumer electronics booms of the 1980s, just as the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 restored the 20% rate and did the same for the Internet economy in the late 1990s ... If Mr. Obama is serious about getting the country out of this recession using something more than public make-work projects, he should restore the integrity of the new company creation cycle: rewrite full disclosure, throw out options expensing, make compliance with Sarbanes-Oxley rules voluntary, and if he won't cut it, then at least leave the capital gains tax rate alone.