Barack Obama, Jim Cramer, the Stock Market and Glengarry Glen Ross

The financial markets are telling the White House that coffee is for closers.

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Let me explain what is going on with Barack Obama's economic policies and the stock market, off 30 percent Election Day. And let me explain it this way: You know the film, Glengarry Glen Ross? At the beginning, Alec Baldwin gives a speech to a room full of underperforming real estate brokers. It's not exactly a pep talk. This is a representative portion:

Nice guy? I don't give a [expletive]. Good father. [Expletive] you, go home and play with your kids. You want to work here, close. You think this is abuse? You think this is abuse, you


[expletive]. You can't take this, how can you take the abuse you get on a sit. If you don't like it, leave. And that, my friends, is how the financial markets work. They don't care about hope. They don't care about change. They don't care about charm. They want results. They want economic growth. They want governments that can pay their debts. And if they think policies of high taxes or runaway spending means slow growth or default, they will brutally punish a country's stocks, bonds and currency.

So the White House can dismiss this slow-motion market plunge because, you know, a market "bobs up and down day-to-day." And it can dismiss CNBC's Jim Cramer's comment that Obama is running a "wealth-destroying" administration as the mutterings of someone from a cable channel that's geared toward "very small audience." But the market's will not be dismissed. They want results and have grave doubts about the course of the U.S. economy. And to quote Baldwin's character again: "You get the picture? You laughing now?"