How to Vaccinate Against Recessionitis

Economic doom and gloom are permeating the American workplace.

By SHARE

The media—and that includes blogs—love to drop the term recessionproof.

News flash: It's impossible to recessionproof anything. That's like trying to stop a world war with a slingshot or hold back the ocean with your retaining wall. If the stuff is gonna hit the fan, it will find you. Sorry if it hurts, but that's life.

There is seemingly no escape from the mood of economic doom and gloom that has permeated American society. But I have important news for you: All this recession talk is hurting your career. Jobacle.com urges you to vaccinate yourself against the latest illness plaguing working stiffs: recessionitis.

How do you know if you're suffering from recessionitis?

WARNING SIGNS:

Fear: Are you suddenly scared to speak up and voice your opinion because you're scared you'll lose your job? Are you not looking for a new job because you feel it's safer to stay put? Do you believe no one is hiring right now? Successful people, or folks who are satisfied with their work, do not give in to fear. Make no excuses, and keep pursuing the dream.

Dizziness: Feeling claustrophobic? As if you have no other options? When you believe you're stuck at work, you can feel helpless and hopeless at the same time. These feelings have a way of sneaking into your home life, causing you to dread work.

Obsessiveness: Suddenly you're a headline junkie, craving unemployment numbers. You've likely Googled the difference between a "depression" and a "recession."

What if you could shut it all out? Ignore it? Turn a blind eye?

You can. It might be easier than you think.

The good news is that recessions in the United States have generally lasted eight to 16 months. That means we could be halfway home already. So clear your mind, and operate for career success as if everything were "A-OK." No one puts your work life in a holding pattern except you.

After holding down various media jobs, including stops at MTV Networks and Fox News, Andrew G.R. was completely discouraged—not only about his own career but also about the lack of job resources that truly spoke to him. Enter Jobacle, the employment blog and podcast designed to Make Work Better.