4 Tips for Welcoming the Office Rookie

Their first days on the job should be memorable for all the right reasons.

A businessman and businesswoman shake hands.
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The introductory phase can last between four to six months. Its duration is intended to make a lasting impression and give new employees an enduring sense of worth as well as a favorable opinion of the institute. "[We want to give] them a sense of purpose and how their day-to-day sync's up with the institutional mission," Fong explains.

Bond inside and outside of work. To build friendly cohesion within the ranks, your company should have an established social gathering for the newest member of your team.

At WRI, the "buddy assignment" is an institutional mainstay. The program consists of matching new hires with co-workers outside their department based upon a common interest like playing the same instrument or having lived in or being from the same country. "It's a little bit of matchmaking that I do," Fong says of the tradition.

But along with the institutionalized tradition should also come organic ones. If co-workers are really taking a liking to their new colleague, social invitations should extend beyond the preliminary lunch or company program.

The grassroots social activities that have sprang up at WRI over the years, including weekly lunch-ins for Portuguese speakers, an ultimate Frisbee team, and happy hours, have positively linked new hires with their colleagues and the organization they work for. "If you connect with the right couple of people, you connect with everything," Fong says.