Cutting Those Budgetbusting 'Necessities'

Young people face a raft of costs their parents didn't have to deal with.

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Young people face a raft of costs their parents didn't have to deal with.

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So do you have to go? Valerie Cabrera Krause, coauthor of The Bridal Wave: A Survival Guide to the Everyone-I-Know-Is-Getting-Married Years, says you should figure out your place in the pecking order: an A-, B-, or even C-list guest. Did you get a last-minute invite? Skip it (though you'll still have to get a gift). If you're going solo, find a "wedding buddy" to share a room and other expenses.

The landline: Ditch it! Quit paying for two phones. Two decades ago, the high cost of long distance was the biggest worry for cash-strapped users. Now, it's doubling your monthly costs for the sake of convenience. As of 2006, Americans spent almost as much on their cellphones as on home numbers, and the cost of mobility is rising faster than the cost of traditional service is falling. Around a quarter of 20-somethings have already gone cell only, according to a 2006 survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, compared with 1 in 8 of all households. Double the phones means double the price, so with more mobile options available, it might finally be time to cut the cord.