The Best Money Advice From Dad

Personal finance experts remember their fathers’ financial wisdom – both sentimental and practical.

Personal finance experts remember their fathers’ financial wisdom – both sentimental and practical
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Rob Seltzer is a CPA in Los Angeles. His father, Jerry, had a master's degree in scenic design in theater but became a speech pathologist who worked with the developmentally disabled and also taught public speaking at a junior college. He passed away a month shy of his 80th birthday in 2001.

[See: How to Improve Your Finances at Every Age.]

Don't be greedy.

"My father advised if you stick your hand inside the marble jar and try to take out all the marbles, you won't get any marbles. Once your fist is full of marbles, it will never fit back through the jar opening. The basic takeaways were don't be greedy and you cannot have it all ... You cannot take everything on at once and you cannot expect immediate results. The plan should be to keep things balanced and take issues one at a time."

This advice was given to Susan Fulton, founder of FBB Capital Partners, an investment management and wealth advisory firm in Bethesda, Md. Her father was Durward Ellsworth Breakefield, who enlisted in the U.S. Army at age 18 in 1928, spending the next 37 years in the Army, serving in World War II, Korea and Vietnam and rising through the ranks to become a brigadier general. He died in 1980 at age 70.