How to Sell Your Home Without an Agent

From pricing to marketing, here are some tips for “for sale by owner” sellers.

Sold sign in front of house
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When Shannon Stell and her husband decided to sell their Yorktown, Va., home this summer, they ran the numbers and discovered that the small amount of equity they built up during two years of homeownership would be wiped out once they paid an agent's commission. Instead, they chose the "for sale by owner" route (or FSBO), and uploaded a listing and photos online with the help of a website called forsalebyowner.com. They gave one showing – to someone who was also selling a home nearby and perhaps wanted to scope out the competition, so Stell doesn't count that showing – and announced an open house through the neighborhood's Facebook page.

A neighbor's daughter and her family stopped by the open house that weekend and on Monday morning, they made an offer. Both parties hired their own real estate attorneys to prepare closing documents, and Stell says the process went smoothly. "It was only on the market for 20 days when we accepted the offer," she says. "We've got that down payment that we didn't have to pay to a Realtor."

[Read: What to Know Before Gifting a Down Payment.]

Forsalebyowner.com is one of several websites that let consumers list their properties on the Multiple Listing Service, or mls.com, instead of paying a real estate professional to do it for them. Eddie Tyner, general manager of forsalebyowner.com, says the website has seen listings grow by 14 percent in the past year. "If a person has the time and willingness to invest in the process, we believe that almost anybody could do this," he says. "The benefits are pretty substantial."

Beyond saving on commission (5 or 6 percent is typical when both parties have an agent), Tyner says FSBO gives homeowners more control over negotiating price and other factors. "If you take out the person in the middle and you're able to negotiate with the actual buyer, you're the only two people who have an interest in it," he says. "If you add other people, some of their interests get put into the equation."

Jane Hodges, author of "Rent vs. Own: A Real Estate Reality Check for Navigating Booms, Busts, and Bad Advice," offers a different point of view. "Most people choose to FSBO because they want to keep as much of their post-sale proceeds as possible," she says. "However, the Realtor argument against this is that a good Realtor can get you sufficiently more for your sale, or accomplish the sale faster, such that their fee and your higher sale price still wash out in a way where you make the same or better money."

Sellers sometimes grumble that their agent set the price too low because the agent wanted to move the property quickly. Then again, agents often know the local real estate market, and sellers sometimes have unreasonable expectations about what their home is worth. "We recommend that people view this as a business transaction and try as hard as they can to keep that mindset," Tyner says. "If they don't [set a reasonable price] they're not going to sell their house."

[Read: 6 Simple Moves to Sell Your Home Faster.]

Nowadays, data about recent sales and comparable properties is readily available online if you're willing to sort through it, which perhaps explains why FSBO listings are becoming more common. "If you live in a neighborhood where there are lots of very similar properties, such as a gated community where homes come in only a handful of flavors and sizes, and there's been some turnover," Hodges says, "it's easy to present your property as one with direct comps and rationalize your pricing."

Of course, if a property is priced too high, it's likely to sit on the market. "The longer a home sits on the market, regardless of listing type, the more 'smell' the listing gets on it," Hodges says. Setting a realistic price from the beginning can prevent the potential stigma associated with a property that sits on the market for long periods of time.

Even if a buyer is interested in a property, a mortgage company won't approve the transaction if the property appraises too far below the expected price. Kim Schnick discovered this over the summer when she sold her home FSBO in Omaha, Neb. "I thought maybe the price was too high, but I went for it anyway and I got an offer in six days," she says. Then the mortgage company's appraisal came in $6,000 below the offered price, so she had to adjust the price.