13 Ways to Save on Your Bathroom Renovation

Rescue your bathroom from the Dark Ages without going broke.

Two washbasin with two faucets.

Save money by checking with local granite shops for remnants to top your bathroom vanity.

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Nobody likes a house with an outdated bathroom.

Of course, you can use a blue toilet and bathe in a pink tub, illuminated by eight naked light bulbs shining on a stained 1970s laminate countertop. But do you really want to?

Building the spa bathroom of your dreams may cost more than you want to spend. But you don’t have to empty your wallet to improve your bathroom. A little bling and a few luxurious touches can give you a big impact for a small amount of money, and that’s a good place to start.

“One little thing creates that luxury instead of worrying about everything else,” says Laura Redd, an interior designer in Greensboro, North Carolina. “I think sparkle is a big thing.”

The easiest way to cut costs on a bathroom renovation is to keep the old bathroom footprint. Keep the toilet, sink and tub or shower in the same locations, just replacing the old with the new. That saves the thousands it costs to add to the footprint of the house or relocate plumbing and electrical wiring.

You should also avoid adding a $100,000 bathroom to a $200,000 house, Redd notes, because you’ll never recoup your investment.

[See: 8 Home Remodeling Projects That Are Worth the Money.]

But there are other ways to save, too.

“Paint is always, on a budget, your best quick option on a makeover,” says Justin DiPego, senior editor of DoItYourself.com. And you can do that yourself.

But with a bathroom renovation, you want to be careful about getting in over your head, especially if your home has only one bathroom.

“Know your limits,” DiPego says. If you’ve never laid tile before, a bathroom is probably not a good place to start. Sometimes, it’s cheaper to hire someone who knows the ins and outs of the job. “You’ll end up saving money in the long run because you won’t screw it up.”

Hiring a contractor is usually smart for plumbing and electrical work, as well as for complicated tile jobs or ones that require tearing out walls.

But, Redd says, don’t let the contractor choose the materials. Shop for them yourself instead. You’ll be sure to get what you want, and you won’t have to pay for the contractor’s shopping time.

Here are 13 ways to save money while improving your bathroom:

Bring in some posh accessories. Search for items that can change the look of your bathroom dramatically without anyone picking up a wrench. Those could include a new shower curtain, plush bath sheets, a new rug, a magnifying makeup mirror or perhaps a flower in a vase. “Don’t cheap out on your towels,” Redd says. “Bamboo towels are phenomenal. They last forever.”

Paint the walls. Avocado fixtures against white may look extremely dated. But change the walls to a complementary color, and “suddenly the avocado green is a player,” says Mary Anne Brugnoni, a designer with Renovations by the Morton Group in Fairport, New York. “Paint is your best friend.”

[Read: How to Remodel Your Kitchen for Thousands Less.]

Change the showerhead. You can buy a rain showerhead, massage showerhead and other models that will give your bathroom a spa look and feel as well as improve your shower experience. Most of the time, you can make the change in five minutes with a wrench.

Shop around for vanities and fixtures. Compare prices online, in big-box stores, in specialty stores and even on Craigslist. Watch for sales and clearance items, too. You can find deals online on everything from faucets to vanities, and the online selection is much larger than what you’ll find at any store.

Use granite remnants for counters. Granite shops often have small bits of granite left over from bigger jobs and will sell you enough for a bathroom vanity counter at a discount. To find out what’s available, call your local shops first then drop by to see the granite and negotiate the price.

Shop around for tile. You can find nice floor and wall tile for $1 to $2 per square foot. Use that less expensive tile for most of the work, and then incorporate luxury tile as accents.