Chart: The Best—and Worst—Places to Build a Nest Egg

Numbers from all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

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As workers throughout the country struggle to rebuild their savings, it's clear that not all states are created equal. With that in mind, U.S. News created an index to measure which states are the best—and worst—for Americans who are saving for retirement. We've looked at each state's housing market, unemployment rate, per capita income, and taxes to get a sense of where Americans are most likely to be able to tuck away money for their nest eggs.

[See the best and worst places to build a nest egg.]

All state-by-state income figures are from 2010. The numbers are nominal, meaning that they're not adjusted for inflation. Tax burdens are from a 2008 study by the Tax Foundation. Real estate numbers refer to how much (per year) each state's home prices are expected to grow between 2010 and 2013. Unemployment rates are from June 2010. For home prices, income, tax burdens, and unemployment, states were divided into 10 brackets based on their relative performance. For each category, states in the bottom bracket received 1 point, while states in the top bracket received 10 points. States with preferential tax treatment for capital gains got a two-point bonus. The maximum total score that a state could receive is 42 points.

[See slideshow: the best and worst places to build a nest egg.]

Here's a look at the numbers from each state.

State Per Capita Income ($) Annual Growth in Home Prices (%) State and Local Tax Burden (% of income) Unemployment Rate (%) Treatment of Capital Gains Score
Wyoming 45,584 4.5 7.0 6.8 Preferential 40
New Hampshire 42,967 1.1 7.6 5.9 Preferential 39
Alaska 43,369 3.5 6.4 7.9 Preferential 38
Washington 41,855 6.6 8.9 8.9 Preferential 32
North Dakota 39,444 0.2 9.2 3.6 Preferential 30
Montana 34,239 3.1 8.6 7.3 Preferential 29
Vermont 39,510 0.9 10.3 6 Preferential 29
South Dakota 37,221 -1.4 7.9 4.5 Preferential 28
Minnesota 41,727 0.8 10.2 6.8 Normal 27
New Mexico 33,524 2.1 8.6 8.2 Preferential 27
Texas 36,469 0.1 8.4 8.2 Preferential 27
Louisiana 35,759 0 8.4 7 Normal 26
Massachusetts 50,320 0.4 9.5 9 Normal 26
Nebraska 38,765 0.5 9.8 4.8 Normal 26
Colorado 41,235 -0.2 9 8 Normal 25
Iowa 37,306 -0.2 9.3 6.8 Normal 25
Maine 37,225 3.1 10 8 Normal 25
Connecticut 54,671 1.1 11.1 8.8 Normal 24
Illinois 41,545 1.4 9.3 10.4 Normal 24
Kansas 38,561 -0.2 9.6 6.5 Normal 24
Virginia 44,113 -0.3 9.8 7 Normal 24
Hawaii 42,372 -1.7 10.6 6.3 Preferential 22
Maryland 48,570 -0.5 10.8 7.1 Normal 22
New Jersey 50,498 0.6 11.8 9.6 Normal 22
Oregon 35,694 3.4 9.4 10.5 Normal 22
Rhode Island 41,746 1.5 10.2 12 Preferential 22
South Carolina 32,229 1.7 8.8 10.7 Preferential 22
Delaware 39,821 -0.7 9.5 8.5 Normal 21
Tennessee 34,471 -0.2 8.3 10.1 Preferential 21
Utah 30,700 0.7 9.6 7.2 Normal 21
Wisconsin 36,893 0.1 10.2 7.9 Preferential 21
Florida 37,600 -5.0 7.4 11.4 Preferential 20
Nevada 37,771 -2.3 6.6 14.2 Preferential 20
Oklahoma 35,413 -0.3 9.8 6.8 Normal 20
Pennsylvania 40,147 0.6 10.2 9.2 Normal 20
West Virginia 32,549 0.3 9.3 8.5 Normal 20
District Of Columbia 67,341 -0.7 10.3 10 Normal 19
North Carolina 34,735 1.3 9.8 10 Normal 19
Alabama 33,544 0 8.6 10.3 Normal 17
Arizona 32,746 -1.5 8.5 9.6 Normal 17
Arkansas 31,985 -0.2 10 7.5 Preferential 17
Idaho 31,804 0.9 10.1 8.8 Normal 17
Michigan 34,535 0.7 9.4 13.2 Normal 17
Mississippi 30,603 0.7 8.9 11 Normal 17
New York 47,727 -2.1 11.7 8.2 Normal 17
Missouri 35,871 -2.1 9.2 9.1 Normal 16
Georgia 33,708 0.5 9.9 10 Normal 16
Indiana 34,196 -2.0 9.4 10.1 Normal 14
Kentucky 32,476 -0.9 9.4 10 Normal 12
California 42,346 -2.6 10.5 12.3 Normal 11
Ohio 35,662 -3.5 10.4 10.5 Normal 9

Sources: The Tax Foundation, Case Shiller, Moody's Analytics, the National Association of Realtors, Equifax, the Bureau of Economic Analysis, the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and the Census Bureau.